Denbigh Asylum- Wales, UKDenbigh Asylum was constructed in 1844 in response to the terrible neglect Welsh patients were facing in English prisons in the 1800s. Since Wales didn’t have the funds to build their own asylums, their sickest patients had to be sent to asylums in the greater UK. Although they received similar treatment to the other English patients, most Welsh patients didn’t speak a word of English, and their doctors in turn spoke no Welsh.Clearly, something had to be done and money was set aside to build Wales its own asylum where patients could receive proper care. After Denbigh was completed it housed 1,500 patients and 1,000 staff
Although it was in use for years, the arrival of mental health reform in the ’60s meant the end for Denbigh, and it was closed in sections from 1991 to 2002. Since 2002 the buildings have stood empty, but the asylum still had one important visitor in the last few years; the Prince of Wales visited in 2004, granting the buildings historic status and saved them from destruction. Although some asbestos removal has started, not much has changed since 2004.
Plans to turn Denbigh into a housing development have been approved, and construction could begin any day.

Denbigh Asylum- Wales, UK

Denbigh Asylum was constructed in 1844 in response to the terrible neglect Welsh patients were facing in English prisons in the 1800s. Since Wales didn’t have the funds to build their own asylums, their sickest patients had to be sent to asylums in the greater UK. Although they received similar treatment to the other English patients, most Welsh patients didn’t speak a word of English, and their doctors in turn spoke no Welsh.

Clearly, something had to be done and money was set aside to build Wales its own asylum where patients could receive proper care. After Denbigh was completed it housed 1,500 patients and 1,000 staff

Although it was in use for years, the arrival of mental health reform in the ’60s meant the end for Denbigh, and it was closed in sections from 1991 to 2002. Since 2002 the buildings have stood empty, but the asylum still had one important visitor in the last few years; the Prince of Wales visited in 2004, granting the buildings historic status and saved them from destruction. Although some asbestos removal has started, not much has changed since 2004.

Plans to turn Denbigh into a housing development have been approved, and construction could begin any day.

15.06.11
Denbigh Asylum- Wales, UKAbandoned mental asylum.See previous post for story.

Denbigh Asylum- Wales, UK

Abandoned mental asylum.

See previous post for story.

15.06.11
Denbigh Asylum- Wales, UKAbandoned mental asylumSee previous post for story.

Denbigh Asylum- Wales, UK

Abandoned mental asylum


See previous post for story.

15.06.11
Hellingly Asylum- East Sussex, EnglandThe Hellingly Asylum in East Sussex wasn’t just a home for mentally ill, it was like a little city. Located deep in the country, the asylum was designed by famed asylum architect George Thomas Hine to be so remote that the stresses of the outside world couldn’t harm the hospital’s delicate patients. Hellingly had its own railway station and tracks that brought coal – and later people – into the compound. It also had its own farmland, water tower, morgue, dentist office, hair salon, and clothing store to supply both the patients and staff with basic necessities. It also had a special wing for “mentally defective” children as well as “advanced treatment” wings where electroshock therapy was practiced.
Given its massive size and primitive treatment methods, Hellingly was shut down in 1994. Having stood abandoned for so long, the damage to Hellingly is incredibly severe. The victim of countless arson attacks, much of the hospital was torched and charred by the time it was set for demolition in 2010. Reportedly, there isn’t much left to Hemminly as of February 2011

Hellingly Asylum- East Sussex, England

The Hellingly Asylum in East Sussex wasn’t just a home for mentally ill, it was like a little city. Located deep in the country, the asylum was designed by famed asylum architect George Thomas Hine to be so remote that the stresses of the outside world couldn’t harm the hospital’s delicate patients. Hellingly had its own railway station and tracks that brought coal – and later people – into the compound. It also had its own farmland, water tower, morgue, dentist office, hair salon, and clothing store to supply both the patients and staff with basic necessities. It also had a special wing for “mentally defective” children as well as “advanced treatment” wings where electroshock therapy was practiced.

Given its massive size and primitive treatment methods, Hellingly was shut down in 1994. Having stood abandoned for so long, the damage to Hellingly is incredibly severe. The victim of countless arson attacks, much of the hospital was torched and charred by the time it was set for demolition in 2010. Reportedly, there isn’t much left to Hemminly as of February 2011

16.06.11
Hellingly Asylum- East Sussex, EnglandAbandoned mental institute.See previous post for details.

Hellingly Asylum- East Sussex, England

Abandoned mental institute.

See previous post for details.

17.06.11
Ibaraki Higashi Hospital, Japan

Ibaraki Higashi Hospital, Japan

29.06.11
Rheumatology Pool, Canadian Red Cross Memorial Hospital- Berkshire, England

Rheumatology Pool, Canadian Red Cross Memorial Hospital- Berkshire, England

04.07.11
Canadian Red Cross Memorial Hospital- Berkshire, EnglandWhat is over the walls??

Canadian Red Cross Memorial Hospital- Berkshire, England

What is over the walls??

05.07.11
Canadian Red Cross Memorial Hospital- Berkshire, England

Canadian Red Cross Memorial Hospital- Berkshire, England

05.07.11
Children’s Ward, Canadian Red Cross Memorial Hospital- Berkshire, London

Children’s Ward, Canadian Red Cross Memorial Hospital- Berkshire, London

05.07.11